Skip to main content area Skip to main content area Skip to institutional navigation Skip to search Skip to section navigation
Feedback

Tag: International Affairs

  • January 9
    By: Sarah Paoletti, Professor of Practice and Director of the Transnational Legal Clinic
    In 2017, the UN and its members, as well as intergovernmental and non-governmental agencies, committed themselves through regional and international dialogue to developing a new framework to address the challenges confronted in and by migration. As the world recognized the need for greater international collaboration, the Trump Administration moved the United States towards a more isolationist approach while implementing restrictive and enforcement-oriented policies and practices, in a notable shift from prior administrations.  As we head into 2018, the United Nations and its members have set out to draft and agree upon an international cooperative framework for managing migration, while also ensuring that the rights of migrants are respected, protected and fulfilled. 2018 will be the year to see whether the political resolve exists to meet this goal, with or without the United States’ participation.
    More »
  • November 6
    By:

    Hafidzi Razali, LLM ’18


    Part IV in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
    More »
  • November 3
    By: Austin Gassen, JD ’19
    Part IV in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
    More »
  • November 2
    By: Hamza El Mouahid, LLM ’18
    Part III in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
    More »
  • October 31
    By: Beatriz Brown, LLM’18
    Part I in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
    More »
  • October 30
    By: Leah Wong, L’18 and Global Affairs Blog Editor
    This year, JD, LLM and SJD students will come together in a series of roundtables to discuss, debate, and explore the idea of culture –  beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
    More »
  • May 19
    By: Dr. Haleh Esfandiari, Former and Founding Director of the Middle East Program, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
    Hassan Rouhani may prevail in tomorrow’s presidential elections. Whether he can continue on the path to reform is uncertain.
    More »
  • February 23
    By: Engy Abdelkader, LLM ’13
    Last month, Senators Cruz, Hatch, Inhofe, and Roberts introduced the Muslim Brotherhood Terrorist Designation Act in Congress. Proponents of the bill cite similar decisions in Syria, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Russia, and Bahrain to support a designation under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). At first blush, these determinations seem like damning evidence, but a closer look reveals that they are largely politically motivated attempts to chill political speech and dissent.
    More »
  • February 8
    By: Allison Kowalski, L’17
    Through a global research seminar at Penn Law, I was able to travel to Cuba for a week to speak to a variety of individuals about Cuba’s past, modern reforms, and future government without a Castro at the head. This is a crucial transition period for Cubans as they face the prospect of an increased role of the private sector domestically and await the implications of a Trump presidency on the previously thawing U.S. – Cuban relations.
    More »
  • August 4
    By: John H. Hepp, IV, L’86
    With the recent publication of Sir John Chilcot’s report criticizing the decisions by then British Prime Minister Tony Blair that led to the 2003 invasion of Iraq, the debate over war crimes has taken a new turn. One hundred years ago, what Blair did might have seemed senseless but it would not have been a crime. But, over the last century, international law has increasingly criminalized individual actions. So in 2016 (or 2003), what Blair did might be deemed not only injudicious but also criminal.
    More »