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Items tagged with blog

News

  • March 29
  • March 24
    Has it been a year already? You may need to renew your New York Times account.
  • March 23
    On display from March 22 - March 29, in the Biddle Law Library Gateway, is the new exhibit from The Philadelphia Reentry Think Tank.
  • March 17
    While historical enmities are at the root of the civil war, South Sudan’s woes amplified due to deficient constitutional engineering. If deeply divided fragile societies like South Sudan are to have a shot at survival, there must be power sharing at every level of governance with sufficient checks and balances. The transitional setup of South Sudan, on the contrary, was devoid of the latter and therefore failed at every step. At the root of it, are three grave constitutional design blunders.
  • March 13
    In discussions of the global migration crisis, women have been portrayed as under threat from “dangerous” Muslim men—first in Europe, and now in the United States. President Donald Trump’s difficult relationship with women and Muslims has set the tone for his presidency. His so-called “Muslim Ban,”  released in the first weeks of his presidency, triggered a flood of international xenophobic messages on the internet. Messages on social media stated specifically that “rapefugees” should not be welcomed,  and included that “[t]he Somalis are the most dangerous to women and children. #Rapefugees.” 
  • March 13
  • March 10

    In recognition of Women’s History Month, Biddle Law Library acknowledges the struggles of women lawyers and honors their contributions with special displays.

  • March 8

    This International Women’s Day, Trump’s concern with Muslim women’s experiences confronting bigotry, hatred, and violence is a welcome opportunity to educate and engage in dialogue.

    In both the United States and the European Union, Muslim women observing hijab are vulnerable to verbal and physical attacks. And, while so-called “honor killings” are seen as undermining women’s rights, such hate crimes are generally viewed through the lens of religion alone.

  • March 1
    Scholarship News announces the most recent additions to The Penn Law Legal Scholarship Repository. The Penn Law Legal Scholarship Repository, a service of the Biddle Law Library, collects and preserves the scholarly output of Penn Law. All works are available for immediate download via PDF.
  • February 28
  • February 23
    Last month, Senators Cruz, Hatch, Inhofe, and Roberts introduced the Muslim Brotherhood Terrorist Designation Act in Congress. Proponents of the bill cite similar decisions in Syria, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Russia, and Bahrain to support a designation under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). At first blush, these determinations seem like damning evidence, but a closer look reveals that they are largely politically motivated attempts to chill political speech and dissent.
  • February 17
    The discussions with in-country experts and spontaneous interactions with Cubans enriched my understanding of the treatment of rights and the prospects for reform in Cuba. I was particularly struck by the complexity of the economic challenges facing the country. In 2011, the Cuban government issued 311 guidelines (referred to as Lineamientos) on reforms to the country’s economic model.
  • February 15
    American legal scholars have ushered in a new school of thought that has been overly skeptical of judicial supremacy. While scholars such as Larry Kramer base their arguments for their distrust of judicial supremacy on the weak premise of it being counter to historical traditions, most scholars put forward the more philosophical argument that judicial supremacy contrives a society where people lose the vital will and motivation for civic participation. These scholars are known as Popular Constitutionalists and they unanimously advocate for putting an end to judicial supremacy and handing the Constitution over to the people.
  • February 13
    With June 20 marking World Refugee Day, Tala al-Jabri, a Syrian-Palestinian strategist in development economics, calls upon the GCC states that have not ratified the 65-year-old U.N. refugee convention to modernize their immigration policies.
    This piece was originally published in Refugees Deeply.
  • February 8
    Through a global research seminar at Penn Law, I was able to travel to Cuba for a week to speak to a variety of individuals about Cuba’s past, modern reforms, and future government without a Castro at the head. This is a crucial transition period for Cubans as they face the prospect of an increased role of the private sector domestically and await the implications of a Trump presidency on the previously thawing U.S. – Cuban relations.
  • February 3
    In recent weeks, there has been an uptick in anti-Sharia legislation, an Executive Order implementing a de facto Muslim ban, and the introduction of a bill in Congress seeking to designate the Muslim Brotherhood a foreign terrorist organization.  So-called “alternative facts” informed by anti-Muslim prejudice and hatred are the commonality threading these legal developments together.
  • February 3

    The Biddle Law Library at the University of Pennsylvania Law School is seeking a service-oriented individual to serve as the first Metadata and Systems Librarian at a law school that prides itself on cross-disciplinary studies.

  • February 1
  • January 30
    In response to President Donald J. Trump’s executive order on immigration ordered late Friday, Dr. Haleh Esfandiari addresses the lasting repercussions that this order will have throughout the Muslim world and recalls her own experiences as an Iranian forced to leave her homeland for America in her article for The Atlantic.
  • December 22
  • December 10
    In honor of Human Rights Day on December 10th, Hayley Winograd L’17, shares her reflections on her documentary A Dignified Death, which addresses issues of the treatment of prisoners and compassionate release from Pennsylvania state prisons. Introduction by Editor Patricia Stottlemyer, L’17.
  • December 7
    Given the prevalence of social media–Facebook now boasts more than 1.7 billion users worldwide, with 293,000 status updates posted each minute–wannabe lawyers are being scrutinized through the unforgiving lens of social networking.
  • December 6
    Part three of a tripartite series as presented by Judge Patrick Robinson of the International Court of Justice at the University of Pennsylvania Law School on November 1, 2016.
  • December 6
    Part two of a tripartite series as presented by Judge Patrick Robinson of the International Court of Justice at the University of Pennsylvania Law School on November 1, 2016.
  • December 6
    Part one of a tripartite series as presented by Judge Patrick Robinson of the International Court of Justice at the University of Pennsylvania Law School on November 1, 2016.
  • December 1
  • November 28
    Set up free online access to the Washington Post with your Penn email address
  • November 14
    The “right to be forgotten” involves new statutes in the EU that allow people to ask Internet content providers to remove information that could hurt their reputation…Forgetting, in this sense, poses a major problem for any search engine, since any query requires a human to make a judgement call. However, I’m focusing on the values and ethics involved
  • November 11
  • November 7

    Contemporary references to “radical Islam” generally trigger associations with terrorism perpetrated by non-state actors or organizations such as ISIS and al-Qaeda. A closer examination of the term’s root origins and evolution reveals that this has not always been so. This article provides a brief historical overview of “radical Islam” from an American perspective. It also highlights myriad social, political, and legal implications that such language carries.