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Items tagged with International

News

  • Research Guides
    March 9
    Below are recently published research guides, prepared by Biddle reference librarians. For a complete list of guides, visit the library’s Guides website.
  • February 25
    Chandra Nukala ML’21 shares his experiences and observations as part of Policy Lab: AI and Implicit Bias, taught by Senior Adjunct Professor of Global Leadership Rangita de Silva de Alwis.
  • February 12

    Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala is set is to be the first woman and first African national to head the World Trade Organization. Prof. Rangita de Silva joins Under Secretary General Phumzile Mlambo Ngcuka to write about Okonjo Iweala’s leadership philosophy that will help her steer the WTO in a global recovery.

  • December 1
    The University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School will join UN Women in honoring the global legacy of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on December 10, International Human Rights Day.
  • November 24
    “Spanish for Law” is designed to help Spanish-speaking students become confident using Spanish legal terminology.
  • August 24
    The article is part of a special online supplemental issue of International Organization focusing on COVID-19 and international relations.
  • June 18
    Leaders from around the globe convene for a virtual event through the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School’s Global Institute for Human Rights.
  • April 20

    Alyssa Cannizzaro L’21 and Eduarda Lague L’21, two students in Associate Dean Rangita de Silva de Alwis’ International Women’s Human Rights class, share their insights from their research papers on COVID-19’s impact on two key issues: reproductive healthcare and domestic violence.

  • Podbean Thumbnail
    April 9
    Penn Law International
    Follow Penn Law’s vibrant programs across the spectrum of international, transnational and foreign law.

    Law Leadership, and Influence
    Highlights from Rangita de Silva de Alwis’ ground-breaking course, which brought together women leaders in law and business for engagement with Penn Law students on the radical changes in public leadership in law and business around the world.

    In our Own Voice
    Student voices discuss various legal topics through a feminist lens.
  • February 10
    Shreya Tewari
  • January 6
    Makenzie Way
  • December 27
    Raghav Mendiratta and Vibha Mohan
  • October 28
    Maria Sevlievska
  • May 15

    Radhika Coomaraswamy, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations, Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict and High-level Mediation Advisory Group to the UN Secretary-General, will serve as a Bok Visiting International Professor in the Fall of 2019 and will teach a course on Women, Peace, and Security with Associate Dean of International Affairs, Rangita de Silva de Alwis.

  • April 22
    STUDENT WORKING PAPER
    Allyson Reynolds L’19 & Allison Perlin L’20 as part of an Independent Study supervised by Rangita de Silva de Alwis, Associate Dean of International Affairs. Report presented to Agnes Callamard, UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions & Ambassador Valentine Rugwabiza, Rwanda’s Permanent Representative to the UN
  • March 6
    Historically, there has been widespread dissent over the precise definition of “feminism”. However, what is most powerful about the concept’s lack of a precise definition is that it is broad enough to encompass the hopes and ambitions of a plethora of different women around the world. International Women’s Day capitalizes on the different needs of women across the globe, presenting the opportunity for these vast and deviating needs to converge around a central theme, to demonstrate that despite our differences, despite our diverging needs, women are still—always—stronger when they are united. This is particularly important in an age where borders are becoming vapider, and people are migrating to different countries to pursue their ambitions. It is critical, therefore, on this momentous day, to understand what women in different places think and feel about feminism, about their country’s progress, and about their hopes for the future.

    This past Fall, I had the distinct privilege to study law at the London School of Economics. I sat down recently with two female student-leaders from LSE to talk about feminism, how the movement has changed to adapt to the 21st century, and to hear their thoughts on entering the legal profession as young women. What is most interesting about this conversation is that, though all three of us come from different countries and backgrounds– Carlotta is from Italy, Rachael from New Zealand, and I am from New York– we all see ourselves as actors that are part of the larger societal fabric, intricately benefitting from, and contributing to the feminist movement. All three of us were touched by Hillary Clinton’s avowal that women’s rights are indeed human rights: with these words echoing across oceans and deserts and reverberating across the metaphoric wild west of the internet, this conversation is proof that 108 years later, women are still united and driven to achieve not only equality but parity in every community and professional field.
  • February 27
    For Women’s History Month, Sharada Srinivasan, CTIC Fellow, talks about the way in which a global leader at Penn Law has championed her academically, professionally, and personally.
  • August 24

    Trevor Noah’s video, though full of inconsistencies and loopholes, raises interesting and pertinent issues; that of duality and hybridity, of hyphenated identity.

  • August 14
  • June 18
    An interview with Elise Kraemer, Executive Director of Graduate Programs. Interviewed by Rangita de Silva de Alwis, Associate Dean of International Affairs
  • May 22
    The United Nations (UN) has long characterized the Rohingya as the world’s most persecuted population. Historically, the Burmese viewed the ethnic and religious minority as illegal immigrants permitted entry by their former British colonizers. Such historical context informs contemporary views of the group as “foreigners.” And that has helped justify decades-long persecution by both private and public actors culminating in the Rohingya’s legal exclusion as citizens and other discrimination codified as law. Despite the group’s pre-colonial ancestral ties to the land, messaging that Rohingya are “outsiders,” “Bengalis” and even, “terrorists,” has helped the government justify mass atrocity crimes. The current humanitarian and human rights crises also implicate national security.
  • May 1
    It is a timely issue of resonance and consequence, the confluence of a class of committed students and an engaging Professor of unparalleled expertise. Our vigorous classroom discussions sounded more like policy debates and revolutionary cries than staid academic deliberation We represented a handful of different countries and states, a global array of religious, cultural, and economic backgrounds. More like a weekly conference than a class, we spent our two hours every Tuesday afternoon in friendly arguments— was it enough to have women at the table, or have people been ignoring a critical variable in the equation, having the right women at the table? And if that is the case, then how do we ensure women in the international community were prepared to lead? And is the top-down approach to securing women’s rights effective, or is that method only paying lip-service to the women living in rural villages who are legally barred from accessing capital to run a business and from attaining a passport without a male guardian’s permission?
  • March 27
    This year’s Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) proved to be a historic one where member states gathered to discuss the substantial progress made in favor of gender equality. While each country addressed areas still in need of work, each event of the CSW offered an inspirational promise of hope. The excitement was palpable whenever discussing the significant progress already made—how women’s voices have been amplified and legitimized through legal reform and political activism.
  • UNGA Summit for Refugees and Migrants
    January 9
    In 2017, the UN and its members, as well as intergovernmental and non-governmental agencies, committed themselves through regional and international dialogue to developing a new framework to address the challenges confronted in and by migration. As the world recognized the need for greater international collaboration, the Trump Administration moved the United States towards a more isolationist approach while implementing restrictive and enforcement-oriented policies and practices, in a notable shift from prior administrations.  As we head into 2018, the United Nations and its members have set out to draft and agree upon an international cooperative framework for managing migration, while also ensuring that the rights of migrants are respected, protected and fulfilled. 2018 will be the year to see whether the political resolve exists to meet this goal, with or without the United States’ participation.
  • November 6
    Part IV in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
  • November 3
    Part IV in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
  • November 2
    Part III in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
  • November 1
    Part II in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
  • October 31
    Part I in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
  • October 30
    This year, JD, LLM and SJD students will come together in a series of roundtables to discuss, debate, and explore the idea of culture –  beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism.