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Tag: Ethics

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Closing Guantánamo Bay Prison 

October 5, 2022

Prof. Claire Finkelstein has co-authored a report that includes recommendations for closing Cuba’s Guantánamo Bay Prison and restoring the rule of law to the law of war.

Ethics, Research and Scholarship 

Excellence in Bioethics 

September 28, 2022

Prof. Anita L. Allen is a recipient of The Hastings Center’s 2022 Bioethics Founders’ Award.

Cross-Disciplinary, Ethics 

Judicial Ethics 

August 18, 2022

Prof. of Practice Lou Rulli recently led an educational session for over 300 Pennsylvania judges, which included a discussion of strategies to better ensure equitable treatment of self-represented litigants.

Courts & the Judicial System, Ethics 

American Philosophical Society Membership 

June 14, 2022

Prof. Anita L. Allen has been elected to the prestigious American Philosophical Society.

Ethics, Research and Scholarship 

Combatting Civil Injustice 

May 17, 2022

The Spring 2022 issue of the Penn Law Journal shines a light on alumni working to disrupt systems of injustice that plague the legal world.

Ethics 

AI & Inequities 

May 11, 2022

Dana Dyer L’22 has authored a trailblazing report shining a light on how AI contributes to racial bias in hiring processes for Black educators.

Ethics, Research and Scholarship, Social Justice, Equity, & Inclusion 

Continuing Judicial Education 

April 28, 2022

Law School faculty regularly coordinate Continuing Judicial Education programming to help Pennsylvania judges stay abreast of cutting-edge legal issues.

Ethics 

Battling Bias 

April 22, 2022

Justice Goodwin Liu of the California Supreme Court spoke about implicit and structural bias during the Provost’s Lecture on Diversity and the Owen J. Roberts Lecture in Constitutional Law.

Ethics, Social Justice, Equity, & Inclusion 

Normalizing Moral Absolutes: The Right to Free Expression 

October 22, 2018

Through the normalization and unanimous acceptance of treaties such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), history has proven that despite our cultural differences, diverging political and economic systems, and unique social norms, the world can agree that certain actions are unquestionably immoral. On the one hand, it, therefore, appears that the world has conceded that there are certain moral absolutes. On the other hand, however, the belief that there are rights and wrongs relative to our own moral convictions abounds.  Saudi Arabia is a case in point.

International Affairs, International Law 

Some Ethical and Practical Concerns Re: “The Right to be Forgotten” 

November 14, 2016

The “right to be forgotten” involves new statutes in the EU that allow people to ask Internet content providers to remove information that could hurt their reputation…Forgetting, in this sense, poses a major problem for any search engine, since any query requires a human to make a judgement call. However, I’m focusing on the values and ethics involved

 

Undermining the Fight Against Global Corruption 

September 19, 2016

The fight against bribery and corruption is rightly a global cause. This fight requires the corporate world’s active participation. Companies must make the effort to ensure their employees and agents around the world do the right thing. But sometimes the legal system gets in the way.

International Affairs, International Law 

Arranging a Doc Screening Leads to Inquiry of Federal Judge’s Impartiality 

December 4, 2015

After federal judge Mark Wolf moderated a panel discussion about The Life and Mind of Mark DeFriest, he was investigated by the FBI, the IRS, the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Massachusetts State Police to determine if he had compromised his ability to preside over a death penalty case.