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Patricia Stottlemyer L’17

Patricia has been awarded the 2017-2018 Chubb Rule of Law & Human Rights Fellowship at Human Rights First, where she will advocate at the intersection of refugee rights and national security reform. She will work with both the refugee protection/representation and national security advocacy teams in Human Rights First’s Washington, DC office. In this capacity, she will represent asylum-seekers in immigration proceedings, and will engage in legal and policy advocacy, including amicus work, to reform counterterrorism policies in accordance with human rights norms and obligations. Her portfolio will include issues of due process, detention, terrorism prosecutions, targeted killings, torture, and Islamophobia.  

Patricia came to Penn Law to launch her legal career at the junction of civil rights and national security. She employs a holistic approach to issue advocacy, marrying direct representation, policy reform, and public relations strategies. With a background in foreign policy and strategic communications, Patricia brings a unique perspective to advocacy around civil and human rights issues. She is interested in the racially disparate impacts of counterterrorism, national security, and surveillance policies. 

While at Penn Law, Patricia has represented clients in asylum and other immigration proceedings as a student legal representative in the Transnational Legal Clinic. She has served as a case manager with the International Refugee Assistance Project, an associate editor of the Journal of Constitutional Law, and as the 2016-2017 editor in chief of the Penn Law Global Affairs Blog. She co-wrote The Fight for Equal Protection: Reconstruction-Redemption Redux with Penn Law Professor Kermit Roosevelt III, published in the University of Chicago Law Review Online. During her 1L summer, Patricia was a legal claims processing intern with the United Nations Register of Damage in Vienna, Austria. She spent her 2L summer at the Brennan Center for Justice’s Liberty and National Security Program, working on legal and policy campaigns surrounding the constitutional and privacy law implications of technology, policing, and surveillance. During her 2L year, she presented her white paper on the intersection of women’s rights and counterterrorism policies in Morocco before the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and UN Women.

Before coming to Penn Law, Patricia served for two years as the communications coordinator at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC. Prior to that, she was program officer at the Syrian Center for Political and Strategic Studies, where she worked with the Syrian political opposition, aided political refugees in their applications for asylum, and wrote congressional testimony given before the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission. After graduating summa cum laude from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Patricia traveled to Tangier, Morocco to study advanced Arabic with the U.S. State Department’s Critical Language Scholarship program. Her article Learning the Right Lessons From Iraq was published in the Fletcher Forum of World Affairs in 2013. She is completing a certificate in Middle East and Islamic Studies from the University of Pennsylvania, and she is proficient in Modern Standard Arabic.