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Alicia Solow-Niederman

Alicia Solow-Niederman

Alicia Solow-Niederman’s research explores what emerging digital technologies, such as artificial intelligence, can tell us about legal institutions and regulatory approaches, and what existing legal systems and practices can show us about emerging digital technologies. Using a mixed methods approach that draws on institutional design, social science, and technical literatures, Alicia considers how technology both challenges and offers opportunities to improve modes of public and private governance. She is especially interested in how to ensure public accountability and democratic legitimacy as government and private firms alike develop and deploy algorithmic tools. Her current project examines how machine learning, the dominant form of artificial intelligence, strains contemporary information privacy protections—and what that reality can teach us about how to design better regulatory interventions.

Alicia’s legal scholarship has appeared in the Southern California Law Review, the Berkeley Technology Law Journal, and the Stanford Technology Law Review. Her essay on data breaches was selected as a winner of the Yale Law Journal’s Student Essay Competition.

Alicia is a cum laude graduate of Harvard Law School, where she was Forum Editor for the Harvard Law Review. After law school, she served as the inaugural fellow in artificial intelligence, law, and policy for UCLA Law’s Program on Understanding Law, Science, and Evidence (PULSE) and then clerked in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Previously, she worked as a project manager at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society and earned her B.A. with distinction in communication and political science from Stanford University.