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Global Affairs Blog

‘This Is the America That Became My Home’

In response to President Donald J. Trump’s executive order on immigration ordered late Friday, Dr. Haleh Esfandiari addresses the lasting impact that this order will have on the Muslim world and recalls her own experiences as an Iranian forced to leave her homeland for America in her article for The Atlantic.

President Trump’s executive order effectively bans Syrian refugees’ entry into the United States indefinitely, as well as institutes a four-month ban on refugees and a three-month ban on all citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries including Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.

 

Dr. Haleh Esfandiari will teach at the Penn Law Global Human Rights Institute in May 2017. In this video, she is being interviewed by Associate Dean Rangita de Silva de Alwis as part of Penn Law’s Women Leading the Law video series.      

 

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