Skip to main content area Skip to main content area Skip to institutional navigation Skip to search Skip to section navigation
Lorem ipsum

New Library Acquisitions: February 2014

March 05, 2014

Biddle Law Library continues to acquire new print and electronic titles. Take a look at our recent acquisitions!

Some highlights include:

image

Christopher Millard, editor, Cloud Computing Law (Oxford, 2013). 

“Cloud computing, whereby software, data processing, data storage and other key IT requirements are delivered as a service via the Internet, is evolving rapidly. However, whilst many organisations are becoming reliant on cloud resources, contracts for cloud services often contain provisions that are inappropriate, unenforceable and/or illegal. Similarly, the application of established data protection concepts to the storage and processing of information in cloud environments can be problematic, with fundamental uncertainties as to what is regulated, who is responsible, which laws apply, and the circumstances in which law enforcement authorities can obtain access to information.

Covering the key legal and regulatory issues surrounding cloud computing, this work provides an invaluable analysis of this evolving area of law. Topics covered include contracts, data ownership and protection, access to data, competition, and consumer protection as well as an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of governance models for cloud computing, making this the most coherent and comprehensive study of the issues surrounding cloud computing law.”

 

image

David Bradshaw and Rachel Potter, editors, Prudes on the Prowl: Fiction and Obscenity in England, 1850 to the Present Day (Oxford, 2013)

“This innovative book comprises nine essays from leading scholars which investigate the relationship between fiction, censorship and the legal construction of obscenity in Britain between 1850 and the present day. Each of the chapters focuses on a distinct historical period and each has something new to say about the literary works it spotlights. Overall, the volume fundamentally refreshes our understanding of the way texts had to negotiate the moral and legal minefields of public reception.

The book is original in the historical period it covers, starting in 1850 and bringing debates about fiction, obscenity and censorship up to the present day. The history that is uncovered reveals the different ways in which censorship functioned and continues to function, with considerations of Statutory definitions of Obscenity alongside the activities of non-government organisations such as the anti-vice societies, circulating libraries, publishers, printers and commentators. The essays in this book argue that the vigour with which novels were hunted down by the prowling prudes of the book’s title encouraged some writers to explore sexual, excremental and moral obscenities with even more determination. Bringing such debates up to date, the book considers the ongoing impact of censorship on fiction and the current state of critical thinking about the status and freedom of literature. Given contemporary debates about the limits on freedom of speech in liberal, secular societies, the interrogation of these questions is both timely and necessary.”

 

image

Kimberly D. Richman, License to Wed: What Legal Marriage Means to Same-Sex Couples (NYU Press, 2013) 

“This book examines the meanings of marriage for couples in the two first states to extend that right to same sex couples: California and Massachusetts. The two states provide a compelling contrast: while in California the rights that go with marriage—inheritance, custody, and so forth—were already granted to couples under the state’s domestic partnership law, those in Massachusetts did not have this same set of rights. At the same time, Massachusetts has offered civil marriage consistently since 2004; Californians, on the other hand, have experienced a much more turbulent legal path. And yet, same-sex couples in both states seek to marry for a variety of interacting, overlapping, and evolving reasons that do not vary significantly by location.

The evidence shows us that for many of these individuals, access to civil marriage in particular—not domestic partnership alone, no matter how broad—and not a commitment ceremony alone, no matter how emotional—is a home of such personal, civic, political, and instrumental resonance that it is ultimately difficult to disentangle the many meanings of marriage. This book attempts to do so, and in the process reveals just what is at stake for these couples, how access to a legal institution fundamentally alters their consciousness, and what the impact of legal inclusion is for those traditionally excluded.”

Be sure to check out the complete list of new acquisitions for more!

Tagged with:

blog, New Library Acquisitions