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Global Online Courses

This innovative new global learning opportunity will provide Penn Law students with a chance to enroll in a remote course led by two of Penn Law’s overseas partner institutions. The Spring 2021 program will include several courses at the Hong Kong University and Hebrew University law faculties; both are widely regarded as among the top Faculties of Law in the world. Courses will focus on a wide variety of comparative, international, and global topics central to legal discourse and debate.

 

FAQs

How many students can participate?

Who are these courses open to?

Will these courses count toward my Penn Law degree?

How many credits will I receive?

How will this grade appear on my transcript?

Am I guaranteed a spot in a given course? 

Will this class meet during standard Penn Law class hours?

How will add/drop work?

How do I apply?

Courses at Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HUJI)

Introduction to Israeli Law

International Criminal Law

Religion and Human Rights through the Lens of Film

Courses at Hong Kong University (HKU)

Law and Economics of Chinese Capitalism

Human Rights in Hong Kong

International Environmental Law

The Legal Foundations of Global Health and Development

Sovereignty in Law, Theory and Culture

China Information Technology and Electronic Commerce Law

Comparative Property Law

Hong Kong Intellectual Property Law

Law, Governance and Development in Asia

Human Rights in China 

Law of the Sea 

PRC Civil and Commercial Law

PRC Intellectual Property Law

FAQs


How many students can participate?

Each participating law faculty can accommodate 10 Penn Law students in dedicated places in their courses. In Spring 2021, there will be a total of 20 available places. Each student will be limited to participation in one global online course per term.


Who are these courses open to?

These courses are open to 2Ls, 3Ls, and LLMs. However, JD/MBA students will not be eligible due to the competing constraints of their program. Graduating students should be aware of differences between academic calendars. The exam period at Hong Kong University will end late-May. Classes at Hebrew University will run through late-June.


Will these courses count toward my Penn Law degree?

Credits earned through these courses can be counted toward the 86 credits required for graduation. These classes will also count toward the 12-credit minimum course load required to maintain full-time student status. However, credits from these courses cannot be applied toward the New York Bar’s 83 credit requirement.  


How many credits will I receive?

The number of credits will vary by course and will be awarded based on the number/length of sessions for which a class meets.  Credit for these courses will be assigned in accordance with the Penn Law Credit Hour Policy.  More specific details can be provided upon request.


How will this grade appear on my transcript?

The body of your transcript will list that you are enrolled in LAW 700-001 along with your other Spring 2021 courses. However, the specific title of the Global Online Course in which you are enrolled and the grade that you receive will only appear in the notes section of your transcript.


Am I guaranteed a spot in a given course?

The number of seats in each course will be very limited and will require the submission of a dedicated course request form. Through this form, students will have an opportunity to identify alternate(s) Global Online Courses if they wish to be considered for a second-choice course.


Will this class meet during standard Penn Law class hours?

These courses will be offered in real time for students living in Hong Kong and Jerusalem and will follow the standard academic schedule for these institutions. Please pay close attention to the meeting times listed.  Even if late/early, we hope you appreciate this opportunity to virtually participate in a foreign classroom environment when traditional mobility is limited.


How will add/drop work?

Due to differences in academic calendars, and in consideration of the process for admission to a Global Online Course, students must add/drop a Global Online Course by the second meeting. If applicable, a waitlist for specific courses will be maintained.


How do I apply?

You do not need to rank a Global Online Course during advance registration.  Instead, please use the appropriate form below to submit a course request by the end of the day on Tuesday, December 8:

Course Request Form for a course at Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HUJI)

Course Request Form for a course at Hong Kong University (HKU)

 

Courses at Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HUJI)


Introduction to Israeli Law (Shereshevsky)

This course provides an overview of the Israeli legal system, on both the normative and institutional levels. It focuses on the constitutional arrangements and the central role of the supreme court in Israel. We will address some of the core issues of the Israeli legal reality, such as judicial activism, the relationship between “Jewish” and “democratic” state, the Occupied Territories, and more. This course will meet for 7 sessions, every other Thursday 9:30-11:15am EST (Meeting dates: 3/18, 4/8, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20.) * Note: due to daylight savings time, the March 18 session will meet at 10:30am EST.


International Criminal Law (Noam)

International criminal law (ICL) went through remarkable developments since the 1990s. These developments include the establishment of various international criminal courts and tribunals, most notably the establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC). The establishment of a permanent international criminal judiciary has posed numerous challenges to the international community and to international criminal law lawyers. The course addresses the main challenges faced by the newly created international criminal law system. The course consists of three parts. The first lessons are devoted to substantive norms of international criminal law, including an examination of the concept of “international crime”, and an analysis of the three principal categories of international crimes: war crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity. The second part of the course is dedicated to discussion of the institutional aspects of international criminal law, including an examination of the unique characteristics of the various forums (domestic and international) in which international criminal adjudication takes place. The last part of the course includes selective issues, such as international immunities, the controversies surrounding the crime of aggression, and certain modes of criminal liability. This course will meet for 14 sessions, on Tuesdays 11:30am-1:15pm EST (Meeting dates: 3/16, 3/23, 4/6, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4, 5/11, 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29.) * Note: due to daylight savings time, the March 16 and 23 sessions will meet at 12:30pm EST.


Religion and Human Rights through the Lens of Film (Raday)

Analysis of the clashes between religion and universal human rights, at the theoretical, legal and social levels, examining the situation in Israel from a wide comparative perspective.
Each issue will be discussed in the context of the three monotheistic religions, international human rights law and comparative case law. Films will be used to present the individual and social dimensions, sometimes tragic, of the issues in the shadow of the law. This course will meet for 13 sessions, on Wednesdays 6:30am-9:15am EST (Meeting dates: 3/17, 4/7, 4/21, 4/28, 5/5, 5/12, 5/19, 5/26, 6/2, 6/9, 6/16, 6/23, 6/30.) * Note: due to daylight savings time, the March 17 session will meet at 7:30am EST.

 

Courses at Hong Kong University (HKU)


Law and Economics of Chinese Capitalism (Ying)

This seminar endeavors to understand Chinese capitalism from the law and economics perspective. What is the constitutional and private legal foundation of Chinese capitalism What is the role of law in Chinese society and business What roles has law played in the different stages of China market transition and different sectors of Chinese economy This course takes an integrative, evolutionary, and comparative approach. Firstly, it integrates studies of black-letter law with observations of Chinese society. In particular, it explores whether and how black-letter law is implemented in reality through a series of case studies in property, corporate governance, constitutional review, etc. Secondly, it investigates the evolution of Chinese law to deepen our understanding on Chinese law and also shed light on its future direction in a rapidly shifting environment. Thirdly, it takes China as a comparative case study to enhance our understanding of law and market institutions. This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Fridays at 5:30am-8:30am EST. * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 6:30am EST.  


Human Rights in Hong Kong (Loper/Ho)

History of enactment, the Bill of Rights Regime, ICCPR, implementation of human rights treaties, Basic Law, interpretation, scope of application, inter-citizen rights, locus standi, permissible limitations, derogation and reservation, enforcement and remedy.  Study of selected rights, including civil and political rights, economic, social and cultural rights and people’s rights. Topics covered include impact on civil and criminal process, right to a fair and public trial, arrest, search and seizure, torture and degrading treatment, liberty and security of person, freedom of association and assembly, freedom of expression, right to nationality, right to family, right to political participation, discrimination and equality, right to housing, social security, education and the environment. The exact topics to be covered will be determined at the beginning of the course and may change from year to year. This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Fridays at 5:30am-8:30am EST * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 6:30am EST. 


International Environmental Law (Cole)

This course aims to provide students with a contextual and elementary understanding of the key global and domestic environmental issues and the purported legal solutions. After a broad survey of the major international environmental laws, this course will look at some selected jurisdictions and see the way in which these jurisdictions deal with environmental problems legally. The jurisdictions that will be looked at include China, the UK and Hong Kong, as well as some major regional organizations such as the EU and ASEAN. Moreover, this course will delve into specific areas of environmental concerns such as the marine environment, climate change and the protection of wildlife. There are no prerequisites for this course. This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Tuesdays at 5:30am-8:30am EST. * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 6:30am EST.  


The Legal Foundations of Global Health and Development (Ho/Ip)

This elective will introduce students to global health law, international moves towards a right to global health, the fundamental human right of access to basic medical services, national and coordinated international responses to and the management of global health hazards (including responses to emergent infections, epidemics, antimicrobial resistance (AMR), addiction and substance abuse), the socio-legal management of and responses to risky behaviors (including STDs, addiction and substance abuse). The course will also cover the role of international law, treaties and instruments touching on global health concerns, and how international law operates, and how it is different from national law. The constitution, function, role and effectiveness of key international global health organizations such as the United Nations, World Health Organization, UNICEF and the FAO will also be studied. This course will meet for 10 sessions, on Tuesdays at 5:30am. 4 of the sessions will end at 8:30am EST while 6 of the sessions will end at 9:00am (Meeting dates: 1/26, 2/2, 2/9, 2/23, 3/2, 3/23, 3/30, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27) * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 6:30am EST.  


Sovereignty in Law, Theory, and Culture (Matthews)

Sovereignty is a centrally important concept for both law and politics, to which recent debates in Hong Kong testify. This course will assess the meaning and significance of sovereignty by drawing on resources from across the arts, humanities and social sciences. What is sovereignty and how is it related to the history of the state? How is our understanding of sovereignty changing in the context of contemporary challenges like globalization, climate change and international terrorism? And what would law and politics looks like without sovereignty? The course takes a broad historical sweep, from early-modern conceptions to the present day.  The course will be of particular interest to students who have enjoyed classes in legal theory, law and literature, law and film, or constitutional law. This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Tuesdays at 8:30pm-11:30pm EST (Dates) * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 9:30pm EST.  


China Information Technology and Electronic Commerce Law (Kwok) *Hybrid

This course examines the key laws and regulations concerning the internet, information technology and related electronic commerce businesses in Mainland China. It intends to provide a wide-angle view of the regulatory regime for the IT and internet industry in Mainland China, in particular as to how such regulatory regime may have any practical impact upon the development of the IT industry in Mainland China. Where appropriate, we will endeavour to compare the regulatory regime in Mainland China with that of other jurisdictions, and to examine the impact of the Chinese internet and IT regulations on cross-border transactions of IT products and services. This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Wednesdays at 5:30am-8:30am EST. * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 6:30am EST.  


Comparative Property Law (Quiao)

This seminar will begin with an inquiry into how members of a society allocate, and should allocate, formal and informal entitlements to scarce resources such as wild animals, labor, water, ideas, and land. It will explore various forms of private property and also alternative regimes such as communal and state property. It will give students an overview of the contemporary debates on property rights, in particular the debate between law and economics and critical legal studies regarding efficiency and fairness of property regimes. It will draw cases from different jurisdictions of the world, in particular the U.S., China, African and South American countries, and different fields of law, including environmental law. This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Tuesdays at 5:30am-8:30am EST. * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 6:30am EST. 


Hong Kong Intellectual Property Law (Clark) *Hybrid

The course will study intellectual property law focused on Hong Kong intellectual property statutes and common law but considered in the broader context of intellectual property laws worldwide and particularly in Mainland China. A particular focus will be the role of intellectual property and the way it encourages or discourages innovation. The extent to which and how the protection of intellectual property should be part of industrial policy will also be considered. Previous study or practice in the area of intellectual property would be an advantage but is not essential provided some preliminary private study is undertaken. This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Mondays at 5:30am-8:30am EST. * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 6:30am EST.


Law, Governance and Development in Asia (Harding)

In the wake of Asia’s striking economic progress, issues of law and governance are now seen as critical for the developing, developed and post-conflict states of Asia. Legal reforms are embracing constitutional, representative government, good governance and accountability, and human rights, based on the rule of law. How and on what principles should Asian states build these new legal orders Is there such a thing as an ‘Asian approach’ to development? Can Asia sustain economic progress and satisfy the demands for the control of corruption and abuse of powers, and the creation of new forms of accountability? This course examines on a broad comparative canvas the nature, fate and prospects for law and governance in developing democracies in Asia. This course will meet for 11 sessions in a special intensive format (Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday) over 3 weeks from March 8 - 26. M/W/F sessions will meet 5:30am-8:30am EST. The 2 Saturday sessions will meet at 1:30am EST. * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 6:30am EST.


Human Rights in China (Palmer) *Hybrid

This course will examine the international and domestic dimensions of the protection of human rights in the People’s Republic of China. It will examine the applicability of international human rights standards to the PRC, the stance of the PRC in relation to international national mechanisms for the protection of human rights, and the place of international standards in domestic law. The course will consider the theoretical debates about the origin and contingency of human rights standards, questions of priorities in human rights, and the issue of rights in Chinese cultural contexts. It will also examine the extent of human rights protections available under the Chinese constitution and other laws, and will focus on selected issues, which may include the criminal justice system, freedom of expression, freedom of association, freedom of religion, labor rights, gender discrimination, and minorities/self-determination. The course will also examine the social and political forces that may contribute to the improvement of human rights in China. This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Wednesdays at 5:30am-8:30am EST. * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 6:30am EST.


Law of the Sea (Cole)

This course will examine some of the important issues in the law of the sea originating from customary international law and law-making treaties, most notably the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. The course will discuss such maritime zones as internal waters, territorial sea, contiguous zones, exclusive economic zones, the high seas, continental shelf, and international seabed areas. It will then consider rules and issues relating to various uses of the various sea zones, such as fishing, deep seabed mining, navigation and communication, marine scientific research, regulation of marine pollution, marine boundary disputes, military uses of the sea, and settlement of marine disputes. The course will also examine the interrelationship between international law and domestic law with respect to maritime matters. Relevant Chinese law will be taken into proper account. This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Fridays at 1:30am-4:30am EST. * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 2:30am EST.


PRC Civil and Commercial Law (Yu)

This course will begin with a discussion of the political economy of China’s legal change. It will then examine the specific areas of the law from both a theoretical and practical approach. Topics addressed in the course will include: contract law, the law on secured transactions, corporate law, securities regulation, and the foreign trade regime in the People’s Republic of China. This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Mondays at 1:30am-4:30am EST. * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 2:30am EST.


PRC Intellectual Property Law (Sun)

This course will meet for 12 sessions, on Thursdays at 12:30am-3:30am EST. * Note: As Hong Kong does not observe daylight savings time, after March 8, this class will meet at 1:30am EST.