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Global Affairs Blog

  • November 13, 2018
    By:

    Shane Fischman L’19,  President of Penn Law Students for Israel and Penn Law Global Affairs Blog Editor & Rachel Chiger L ’19, President of the Penn Law Chapter of the Louis B. Brandeis Society


    In the aftermath of this attack, CNN reported: “Dismay, horror, and disbelief were feelings shared by many in the aftermath of the mass shooting at a synagogue in Pittsburgh.” Similar headlines blazed the front pages of international dailies, such as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, BBC, and The Guardian. While the international community certainly reacted to the shooting with dismay and horror, disbelief was not among the emotions that registered in the Jewish community.


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    Tags: Antisemitism, Blog, Constitutional Law, Freedom of Religion, Human Rights, International Affairs
  • November 6, 2018
    By: James Albrecht L’19
    I am currently a visiting student at King’s College London, set right on the Thames River in the heart of London.  Seeking to take advantage of everything London has to offer both in the city and in the classroom, I have decided to embark on a comparative analysis of the law which I have studied so far at Penn Law.  Because I will be working in a corporate firm when I graduate, for a majority of my courses I chose a corporate concentration and I have enrolled in Competition law, the Law of the Company, and Public International Law. Though these classes are seemingly typical, it is for that reason that I chose to enroll in them here: the chance to study these topics in the EU and UK context is a privilege I would not have had at home, and it is an opportunity to compare the distinctions between the US and UK, which are both common law countries.
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    Tags: Blog, corporate law, International Comparative, Study Abroad
  • October 22, 2018
    By: Shane Fischman, JD’19 and Global Affairs Blog Editor
    Through the normalization and unanimous acceptance of treaties such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), history has proven that despite our cultural differences, diverging political and economic systems, and unique social norms, the world can agree that certain actions are unquestionably immoral. On the one hand, it, therefore, appears that the world has conceded that there are certain moral absolutes. On the other hand, however, the belief that there are rights and wrongs relative to our own moral convictions abounds.  Saudi Arabia is a case in point.
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    Tags: Blog, ethics, Freedom of Expression, Freedom of Press, International Affairs, International Law, Saudi Arabia
  • October 16, 2018
    By: Austin Gassen L‘19
    Studying abroad in law school is definitely not the norm. That being said, while studying in Colombia has been a giant change, it has given me a completely different perspective on both international law and domestic law in the United States.
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    Tags: Blog, International Affairs, International Comparative, International Law, Study Abroad
  • October 12, 2018
    By: Mary Lester L’19
    The #MeToo movement has made significant progress exposing the prevalence of sexual violence in today’s society, while also helping to dispel myths that prevent victims from speaking out against their abusers. The movement has gained more power than ever over the past year, holding once untouchable men, such as Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby, and Matt Lauer, accountable for their actions. #MeToo has also dismembered myths surrounding sexual assault and harassment, including the idea that such violence is unpreventable because “boys will be boys,” or that a woman is “asking for it” if she dresses or acts a certain way. However, even with such significant progress, the treatment of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations of sexual assault against Supreme Court Nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh show the steps that still must be taken before the country takes sexual violence seriously.
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    Tags: Blog, global women leadership project, Supreme Court, Womens Rights
  • October 3, 2018
    By:

    Amanda LeSavage L’19 & Editor-in-Chief of University of Pennsylvania Journal of Law & Public Affairs Vol. 4 


    Kathy Ruemmler showed up to her first day of law school without ever having met a lawyer. Georgetown University Law Center was a far cry from the small, rural town in Washington State she called home, but she quickly learned how to overcome the challenges presented by law school and the legal profession. Within two years, she became the Editor-in-Chief of the Georgetown Law Journal, and by the time she was 40-years-old, she was the top lawyer in the White House.
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    Tags: Blog, Public Affairs, Womens Rights
  • September 17, 2018
    By: Rangita de Silva de Alwis, Associate Dean of International Affairs & Global Advisor, UN SDG Fund
    As world leaders convene at the 73rd Session of the UN General Assembly (UNGA) in New York, the University of Pennsylvania is honored to host President Alain Berset, President of the Swiss Confederation on September 27th.
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    Tags: Blog, International Affairs, International Law
  • August 30, 2018
    By: Shane Fischman L’19 and Global Affairs Blog Editor and Allyson Reynolds L’19
    Students explore feminism and shared experiences through conversations with each other.
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    Tags: Blog, Feminism, Womens Rights
  • August 29, 2018
    By:

    Sophie L’Hélias LLM ’87


    In honor of Gender Equality Day, Penn Law celebrates Sophie L’Hélias LLM ’87, founder of the Gender Diversity Exchange℠ (GDE). In the story below, she digs deep into her intimate narrative and the powerful forces, both personal and political, that led her to create this groundbreaking index described by L’Hélias as “a search engine for positive impact, that draws upon my experience as an investor, lawyer and board director.”


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    Tags: Blog, global women leadership project, International Affairs, Womens Rights
  • August 28, 2018
    By: Radhika Saxena LLM’19 and Human Rights Scholar
    In the wake of these movements, India saw a “Naming and Shaming” Campaign spread through social media. Raya Sarkar, then an LL.M. Candidate at University of California, Davis School of Law, posted a crowd-sourced list of Indian academicians who were alleged to have committed acts of sexual harassment or assault on her Facebook account in October 2017, which soon became viral.
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    Tags: Blog, Feminism, global women leadership project, International Affairs, Womens Rights