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Global Affairs Blog

  • March 27, 2018
    By: Kimberly Panian, L’18
    This year’s Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) proved to be a historic one where member states gathered to discuss the substantial progress made in favor of gender equality. While each country addressed areas still in need of work, each event of the CSW offered an inspirational promise of hope. The excitement was palpable whenever discussing the significant progress already made—how women’s voices have been amplified and legitimized through legal reform and political activism.
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    Tags: Blog, International Affairs, International Law, International, United Nations
  • January 9, 2018
    By: Sarah Paoletti, Professor of Practice and Director of the Transnational Legal Clinic
    In 2017, the UN and its members, as well as intergovernmental and non-governmental agencies, committed themselves through regional and international dialogue to developing a new framework to address the challenges confronted in and by migration. As the world recognized the need for greater international collaboration, the Trump Administration moved the United States towards a more isolationist approach while implementing restrictive and enforcement-oriented policies and practices, in a notable shift from prior administrations.  As we head into 2018, the United Nations and its members have set out to draft and agree upon an international cooperative framework for managing migration, while also ensuring that the rights of migrants are respected, protected and fulfilled. 2018 will be the year to see whether the political resolve exists to meet this goal, with or without the United States’ participation.
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    Tags: Blog, International Affairs, International Law, International, Migrants, Migration, Sarah Paoletti, United Nations, United States
  • November 6, 2017
    By:

    Hafidzi Razali, LLM ’18


    Part IV in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
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    Tags: Blog, International Affairs, International
  • November 3, 2017
    By: Austin Gassen, JD ’19
    Part IV in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
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    Tags: Blog, International Affairs, International
  • November 2, 2017
    By: Hamza El Mouahid, LLM ’18
    Part III in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
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    Tags: Blog, International Affairs, International
  • November 1, 2017
    By: Ebenezer Gyasi, JD ’19
    Part II in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
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    Tags: Blog, Culture, International
  • October 31, 2017
    By: Beatriz Brown, LLM’18
    Part I in a Series that discusses, debates, and explores the idea of culture – beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
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    Tags: Blog, Culture, International Affairs, International
  • October 30, 2017
    By: Leah Wong, L’18 and Global Affairs Blog Editor
    This year, JD, LLM and SJD students will come together in a series of roundtables to discuss, debate, and explore the idea of culture –  beginning with its definition to how it intertwines with other social constructs and trends such as class, gender, sexuality, populism, and activism. 
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    Tags: Blog, Culture, International Affairs, International
  • October 11, 2017
    By: Amal Sethi, Assistant Editor and SJD Candidate and Anusha Ramesh, LLM’18
    The Right to Privacy’s legacy in India commenced with the 1975 case of Gobind v. State of M.P. In this verdict, the Indian Supreme Court while acknowledging the absence of the term “privacy” in the Indian Constitution, relied on Justice Douglas’ famous ‘penumbral’ reasoning in Griswold and gave recognition to the Right to Privacy as being inherent in the totality of the Indian Constitutional structure. Since then, the Supreme Court has time and again expanded the contours of the right to privacy in a diverse range of judgments relating to phone tapping, narco-analysis, brain mapping, prisoner’s rights, and computer networks.
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    Tags: Blog, India, Indian Supreme Court, Privacy
  • October 2, 2017
    By: Usama Malik

    According to the United Nations, Rohingya Muslims are considered to be the most persecuted minority group in the world. These unfortunate people are an ethnic Muslim minority numbering around one million living in the Buddhist majority country of Myanmar. The Rohingya have been residing in the northern parts of “Rakhine”, which is a geographically isolated state in western Myanmar. The word “Rohingya” is considered taboo in a country where they have been residing for more than a century. The continued victimization of Rohingyas at the hands of the Myanmar government is not a contemporary issue. The former British colony after achieving independence in 1948 has been struggling with armed ethnic and religious conflict.


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    Tags: Blog, Human Rights, International Affairs, International Law