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Penn Program on Regulation

PPR HOLDS FOLLOW-UP WORKSHOP ON CAPITOL HILL
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013
1:00-3:30 PM
RAYBURN OFFICE BUILDING, ROOM 2237
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

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Regulation's Impact on Jobs:
Economic Analysis and Institutional Reform

September 27-28, 2012
3:30 pm on Thursday - 3:30 pm on Friday

University of Pennsylvania Law School
3501 Sansom Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104

With U.S. unemployment remaining at high levels, the phrase "job-killing regulations" has become a popular mantra in some quarters as an explanation for the sluggish pace of employment growth. Earlier this year, President Obama opined that regulations sometimes have "had a chilling effect on growth and jobs." Most recently, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill that would freeze new significant regulations until the national unemployment rate drops to six percent.

The deep concern among policymakers about regulation's impacts on employment has yet to be matched by many agencies' analytical practices. The prevailing executive order on regulatory analysis directs agencies to go beyond the calculation of compliance costs to estimate the effects of new regulations on "productivity, employment, and competitiveness." Nevertheless, employment impacts are typically given, at best, only cursory consideration in regulatory impact analyses. In the absence of better analysis, regulations' precise impacts on jobs remain politically controversial.

To advance research and analysis of both the analytical and institutional issues raised by the current controversy over regulation and jobs, the Penn Program on Regulation is convening a conference at the University of Pennsylvania Law School on September 27-28, 2012. The conference will consider questions such as:

The conference will begin at 3:30 pm on Thursday, September 27th and conclude by 3:30 pm on Friday, September 28th. Panels will feature papers commissioned by the Penn Program on Regulation for a forthcoming book expected to be published next year by the University of Pennsylvania Press. Authors of work presented will include: Matthew Adler (Duke Law), Joseph Aldy (Harvard), Chris Carrigan (George Washington), Cary Coglianese (Penn Law), E. Donald Elliott (Wilkie Farr/Yale), Rolf Färe (Oregon State), Adam Finkel (Penn Law), Wayne Gray (Clark), Shawna Grosskopf (Oregon State), Mike Livermore (NYU), Brian Mannix, Jonathan Masur (Chicago), Al McGartland (EPA), Richard Morgenstern (RFF), Carl Pasurka (EPA), William Pizer (Duke), Lisa Robinson, Jason Schwartz (NYU), Ron Shadbegian (EPA), and Stuart Shapiro (Rutgers).

Partial support for this conference and book project is provided by the
National Science Foundation (Decision, Risk, and Management Sciences program),
under grant # 0756539