Matthew Adler Matthew D. Adler
Matthew D. Adler is Richard A. Horvitz Professor of Law and Professor of Economics, Philosophy and Public Policy at Duke University. His scholar- ship lies at the intersection of public law, welfare economics, and moral philosophy. He is the author of Well-Being and Fair Distribution: Beyond Cost–Benefit Analysis and, with Eric Posner, New Foundations of Cost–Benefit Analysis. His current research focuses on ways to incorporate distributive considerations and more sophisticated measures of human well-being into policy analysis.
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Christopher CarriganChristopher Carrigan
Christopher Carrigan is an Assistant Professor at the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration at George Washington University, where he teaches courses on microeconomics and applied statistics. His research is focused on how political influences, social forces and organizational characteristics interact to shape outcomes at government agencies. Currently, Professor Carrigan is analyzing the extent to which locating non-regulatory functions with regulators affects both behavior at and performance of these organizations. ...
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E. Donald Elliott E. Donald Elliott
E. Donald Elliott is an Adjunct Professor of Law at Yale University Law School and Senior of Counsel at Covington & Burling, LLP. He is a leading academic scholar, as well as practitioner, in the fields of administrative and environmental law. He has been on the Yale Law faculty since 1981 and currently teaches courses in environmental law, energy law, administrative law and civil procedure. He was General Counsel of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 1989 to 1991 and its liaison to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs.
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Anne E. Ferris Anne E. Ferris
Anne E. Ferris is an Economist for the National Center for Environmental Economics at the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Ferris previously served as the Deputy Associate Director for Energy and Climate Change on the White House Council on Environmental Quality and as a Senior Research Associate at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. She completed her undergraduate training in economics at the University of Chicago and received her PhD in economics from the University of Michigan.
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Wayne B. Gray Wayne B. Gray
Wayne B. Gray is Professor of Economics at Clark University.He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Coordinator of the Boston Research Data Center of the United States Census Bureau. He is also affiliated with Clark University’s Marsh Institute. Dr. Gray's research focuses on the consequences of environmental regulation for productivity and risk management.
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Michael A. Livermore Michael A. Livermore
Michael A. Livermore is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law. His primary teaching and research interests are in administrative law, environmental law, cost-benefit analysis and executive review of agency decision-making. He has published numerous books, chapters and articles on these topics, with a special focus on the role of interest groups and public-choice dynamics in shaping the application and methodology of cost-benefit analysis. He was the founding executive director of the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law, a think tank dedicated to improving the quality of government decision making through advocacy and scholarship.
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Jonathan S. Masur Jonathan S. Masur
Jonathan S. Masur is Deputy Dean and Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. His research and teaching interests include administrative law, behavioral law and economics, patent law, and criminal law. Prior to joining the faculty he served as a Bigelow Fellow and Lecturer in Law and as a law clerk to Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.
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Richard D. Morgenstern Richard D. Morgenstern
Richard D. Morgenstern is a Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future. His research focuses on the economic analysis of environmental issues with an emphasis on the costs, benefits, evaluation, and design of environmental policies, especially economic incentive measures. His analysis also focuses on climate change, including the design of cost-effective policies to reduce emissions in the United States and abroad. He has served in the State Department, where he participated in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations, and in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where he oversaw policy, planning, and evaluation.
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William A. Pizer William A. Pizer
William A. Pizer is an Associate Professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy and Faculty Fellow in the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University. His current research examines how to promote clean energy through private-sector investments, how environmental policy can affect production costs and competitiveness, and how the design of market-based environmental policies can be improved. From 2008 to 2011, he was Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment and Energy at the U.S. Department of the Treasury....
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Lisa A. Robinson Lisa A. Robinson
Lisa A. Robinson is a Senior Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government and an Affiliated Fellow of its Regulatory Policy Program. She is also a Research Associate at the Harvard School of Public Health, where she is affiliated with the Center for Health Decision Science and the Center for Risk Analysis. She specializes in the economic analysis of environmental, health, and safety regulations....
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Ronald J. Shadbegian Ronald J. Shadbegian
Ronald J. Shadbegian is an Economist at EPA’s National Center for Environ- mental Economics and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Economics for Georgetown University’s Economics Department and Public Policy Institute. His research focuses on the costs of complying with environmental regulations and on the regulatory effectiveness and economic impact of environmental regulations, including studies on employment, productivity, investment, environmental performance, and technological change....
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Joseph E. Aldy Joseph E. Aldy
Joseph E. Aldy is Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, a Nonresident Fellow at Resources for the Future, a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and the Faculty Chair of the HKS Regulatory Policy Program. His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation. In 2009–2010, he served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment at the White House....
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Cary Coglianese Cary Coglianese
Cary Coglianese is the Edward B. Shils Professor of Law and Professor of Political Science, and the Director of the Penn Program on Regulation at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He specializes in the study of regulation and regulatory processes, with an emphasis on the empirical evaluation of alternative regulatory strategies and the role of public participation, negotiation, and business-government relations in policy making. He is founder and faculty advisor to RegBlog.org and editor of Regulatory Breakdown: The Crisis of Confidence in U.S. Regulation, also published by the University of Pennsylvania Press....
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Rolf Färe Rolf Färe
Rolf Färe is Professor of Economics and Agricultural and Resource Economics at Oregon State University.His research is rooted in the areas of production and duality theory, which is documented in 12 books, over 200 refereed journal articles, and over 50 contributions to books. He is an Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) most highly cited scholar in the area of economics and finance and also serves on the editorial boards of two journals. He is currently developing production models for the joint production of good and bad outputs, and adopting them as tools in performance measurement, allowing him to bridge a broad area of economics including environmental economics, international trade, and index number theory.
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Adam M. Finkel Adam M. Finkel
Adam M. Finkel is a Senior Fellow and Executive Director of the Penn Program on Regulation at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He is one of the nation’s leading experts in the evolving field of risk assessment and cost-benefit analysis, with 25 years of experience improving methods of analysis and making risk-based decisions to protect workers and the general public from environmental hazards. He was a senior regulatory and enforcement official at the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration from 1995 to 2005 and has been a professor at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Public Health and at Princeton University.
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Shawna Grosskopf Shawna Grosskopf
Shawna Grosskopf is Professor Emerita of Economics at Oregon State University. Her research interests are in public economics and performance measurement. Recent research has included work on the relative performance of charter schools, using directional distance functions to model and measure productivity in the presence of environmental byproducts, assessing performance in health care.
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Brian F. Mannix Brian F. Mannix
Brian F. Mannix is a Visiting Scholar at the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center and President of Buckland Mills Associates. From 2005 to 2009, he served as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Associate Administrator for Policy, Economics, and Innovation. Earlier, he served as Deputy Secretary of Natural Resources for the Commonwealth of Virginia. From 1987 to 1989, he was the managing editor of Regulation magazine at the American Enterprise Institute.
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Al McGartland Al McGartland
Al McGartland is Director of the National Center for Environmental Economics in the United States Environmental Protection Agency. He advises EPA’s senior leadership on regulatory analyses, science, and environmental policy. He is responsible for insuring EPA’s analyses reflects the latest science and develops interdisciplinary risk and benefit assessment methods to be used in EPA’s regulatory analyses. Most recently, he has been focusing on improving methods for quantifying health risks and uncertainty for use in benefit-cost analysis, the benefits of protecting the Chesapeake Bay, and on the economics of climate change.
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Carl A. Pasurka Jr. Carl A. Pasurka Jr.
Carl A. Pasurka, Jr. is an Economist with the National Center for Environmental Economics at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University. His current research focuses on cost and productivity issues associated with environmental regulations. In addition, he has served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management (1994–1996) and recently started serving as an Associate Editor of Energy Economics....
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Eric A. Posner Eric A. Posner
Eric A. Posner is the Kirkland & Ellis Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Aaron Director Research Scholar at the University of Chicago Law School. He has published articles on bankruptcy law, contract law, international law, cost-benefit analysis, constitutional law, and administrative law, and has taught courses on international law, foreign relations law, contracts, employment law, bankruptcy law, secured transactions, and game theory and the law. His current research focuses on international law, immigration law, and foreign relations law.
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Jason A. Schwartz Jason A. Schwartz
Jason A. Schwartz is Adjunct Professor and Legal Director of the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law. He graduated magna cum laude from New York University School of Law and worked previously as a public policy associate at Pillsbury Winthrop. He has authored publications on climate change and state regulatory policy, such as 52 Experiments with Regulatory Review: The Political and Economic Inputs into State Rulemaking and The Road Ahead: EPA’s Options and Obligations for Greenhouse Gas Regulation.
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Stuart Shapiro Stuart Shapiro
Stuart Shapiro is an Associate Professor and Director of the Public Policy Program in the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University. He has written extensively about the U.S. regulatory process and the role of cost–benefit analysis in regulatory decision making. Prior to joining the faculty at Rutgers, he worked for five years at the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs as a desk officer and assistant branch chief.
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