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Quattrone Center for the Fair Administration of Justice

Research

  • January 22, 2016
    In this study, completed in partnership with researchers at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law and the Opportunity Institute, Executive Director John Hollway assesses the cost of criminal justice errors in California.  Between 1989 and 2012, defendants in 692 adult felony criminal cases were subject to faulty convictions, serving more than two thousand years in prison and jail.  These faulty convictions cost California taxpayers more than $282 million.
  • December 23, 2015
    U.S. policymakers and the public are increasingly concerned about wrongful convictions, situations where innocent individuals have been convicted and incarcerated for crimes they did not commit. The most prevalent institutional response by prosecutors to address post-conviction fact-based claims of actual innocence is the Conviction Review Unit (CRU), sometimes called the Conviction Integrity Unit. Since the creation of the first CRU in the mid-2000s, more than 25 such units have been announced across the country; more than half of these have been created in the past 24 months.

    Most CRUs have grown up ad-hoc, often in reaction to a limited number of specific cases with unique circumstances. Very few have written protocols, policies, or procedures, and few of those have been made public. This paper reports results from the first ever national survey of CRUs designed to assist: (a) Current CRUs in understanding how their peers have approached common challenges; (b) Offices without CRUs in the creation of effective units; and (c) Communities in developing metrics to evaluate the units and their utility.
  • October 16, 2015
    The Access to Justice Commission, an initiative of the Delaware Judiciary, has requested analysis of several aspects of Delaware’s criminal justice system to determine whether reforms in policing, prosecution, adjudication and imprisonment can be accomplished in a way that would reduce racial disparities, while not increasing the incidence of violent crime. The Quattrone Center provided recommendations to the commission on ways to improve fairness in police searches, bail, charging and sentencing, and application of alternatives to incarceration.
  • April 20, 2015
    This white paper describes an internal Root Cause Analysis (“RCA”) conducted by the Montgomery County, PA District Attorney’s Office in partnership with the Quattrone Center. The Quattrone Center specializes in RCA regarding errors within the criminal justice system. RCA has been used in complex and fragmented industries (e.g., healthcare, aviation, nuclear power) to understand the various factors (direct and environmental) that lead to both individual and systemic-based errors, and to provide interventions that can effectively prevent future error.
  • February 1, 2014
    The “systems approach” has been used, improved, and refined over time to improve safety and reduce errors in a variety of complex, high-risk industries, including health care, aviation, and manufacturing, among others. While the challenge of preventing errors in well-meaning complex systems is neither new nor unique to criminal law, the need for error reduction in the criminal justice system is clear. This document advocates for the application of a systems approach to reducing errors in the criminal justice system, generating reform in a fashion that will unify well-intentioned but professionally adversarial participants around an objective shared by all: the integrity of investigations, prosecutions, and adjudications, and the elimination of known and currently unknown errors that undermine the fair administration of justice. It then sets forth requirements for the successful application of a systems approach, and a model for interaction among researchers, reformers, and practitioners in the criminal justice system – including prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, and law enforcement officials – that will allow for more rigorous analyses of the criminal justice system and the design, testing, dissemination and implementation of successful best practices that will improve the fair administration of justice.