Conference Details

Thursday June 23 – Friday June 24, 2011

The University of Pennsylvania Law School, the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, and the Georgetown Institute for Global History

McNeil Center for Early American Studies
34th & Sansom Street

Download Schedule [PDF]

Thursday June 23

1:00 pm Welcome and opening remarks
Sarah Barringer Gordon, Department of History and Law School, University of Pennsylvania
1:30 - 3:00

Panel 1: Remembering and Forgetting


Mark Meuwese, Department of History, University of Winnipeg
A Tale of Two Massacres in Colonial Brazil

Ann Emmons, Department of English, University of Colorado, Boulder
"The Word of God Writ Large in Rock": The Mythopoetics of the Almo Massacre

Christine M. DeLucia, Department of American Studies, Yale University
"How Could we Not Remember?" Recalling and Forgetting Massacres of King Philip's War at Great Swamp and Peskeomskut

Commentator: Richard Turley, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Assistant Church Historian
3:15 - 4:45

Panel 2: Violence, Laws, States, and Empires


Matthew A. Cook, Departments of History and English, North Carolina Central University
We Have Sindh: Violence and British Imperial Authority in the Indus Region

John Smolenski, Department of History, University of California, Davis
The Paxton Uprising and the Problematic Status of 'Friendly' Indians in Colonial Pennsylvania

John Savage, Department of History, Lehigh
Rumor, Violence, Memory, Legality: The Massacre of the Fete-Dieu in Martinique (1790)

Commentator: Thomas J. Humphrey, Department of History, Cleveland State University
  Break
5:00 - 6:15 Keynote Address
Karl Jacoby, History Department, Brown University
'Wondering Horror': A History of Violence and the Violence of History
6:15 - 7:15 Reception
Friday June 24
9:15 - 10:45 am

Panel 3: Meanings and Memories of Violence, I


Christian Ayne Crouch, Department of History, Bard College
"It Cost us No Person": The Problem of Writing about Routine Acts of violence in the Borderland

Michelle LeMaster, Department of History, Lehigh University
"[B]utchered after the most barbarous manner": Massacre and Gendered Violence in the Tuscarora War

Jeffrey Ostler, Department of History, University of Oregon.
Toward an Indigenous History of Massacres (and Annihilation in General) Examples from Eastern North America, 1750s-early 1800s

Commentator: David J. Silverman, Department of History, George Washington University
11:00 - 12:15 pm

Panel 4: Meanings and Memories of Violence, II


Ann Marie Plane, Department of History, University of California, Santa Barbara
"God hath left our Nation to destroy": Visionaries, Revenge, and Traumatic Reenactment on the Maine Frontier in King Philip’s War, 1675-1677

Jean-Francois Lozier, Department of History, University of Toronto
Revisiting the 'Lachine Massacre' of 1689

Commentator: Alison Games, History Department, Georgetown University
12:15 - 1:45 Lunch
1:45 - 3:00

Panel 5: Religion


Sarah Barringer Gordon, Department of History and Law School, University of Pennsylvania
Jan Shipps, Departments of History and Religion, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
The Sins of the Fathers: The Mountain Meadows Massacre in Religious History

Jennifer Graber, Department of Religious Studies, The College of Wooster
"You Shall Live, You Shall Live": Religious Transformation and the Massacre at Wounded Knee

Commentator: Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, History Department, Harvard University
3:15 - 4:30

Panel 6: Rhetoric and Representation


Eamon Darcy, Trinity College, Dublin
Massacres in the early-modern British imagination

Joanne Van der Woude, Department of English, Harvard University
Imperial Carnage and Epic Suffering in early Latin American Literature

Commentator: Paul Saint-Amour, Department of English, University of Pennsylvania
4:30 Closing remarks
Alison Games, History Department, Georgetown University