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Economics of Digital Services

Digital Economy

Economics of Digital Services The Economics of Digital Services (EODS) is an initiative of the Center of Technology, Innovation & Competition (CTIC) and the Warren Center for Network & Data Sciences that promotes research on digital platforms with a focus on empirical studies. The initiative is possible through a major grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation as part of its $50 million initiative to support scholarly inquiry and novel approaches that will strengthen our democracy as the digital age progresses.

The initiative supports new research on the impact of data, algorithms, and the economics of digital platforms to increase the understanding of market dynamics for online services and the business strategies that digital platforms are pursuing. The resulting research will contribute to deepening the foundation for the proper scope of antitrust enforcement and regulatory intervention.

In the inaugural phase, EODS funded nine research proposals in such areas as cloud competition, advertising, data neutrality, smart contracts, and the effect of search engines on the media industry. Authors presented their findings at the Inaugural Economics of Digital Services Research Symposium on September 10-11, 2021. For the second phase of the initiative, EODS awarded five grants in October 2021. The findings were presented at the Second Economics of Digital Services Research Symposium on September 9-10, 2022. Research topics, authors, and links to full papers and blog articles for both symposia are listed here.

In November 2022, CTIC and the Warren Center announced the initiative’s 2023 grant recipients.  Research areas and scholars are listed below. Findings will be presented at the third symposium on September 8-9, 2023, and posted on the EODS initiative’s website and blog.

- Algorithmic Consumption: Screening and Persuasion—Shota Ichihashi, Queen’s University, and Alex Smolin, Toulouse School of Economics
- Buy-Box vs. FBA: Amazon’s Self-Preferencing in its Vertical-Integrated Kingdom—Muxin Li, Bocconi University
- Digital Platforms and Gender Inequality: Evidence from Pandora—Abhishek Nagaraj and Aruna Ranganathan, University of California Berkeley
- Learning on Social Media Platforms and the Design of News Feed Algorithms—Kevin S. He, University of Pennsylvania
- Multi-Homing and Concentration in the Media Advertising Market—Joan Calzada, University of Barcelona, and Ricard Gil, Queen’s University

Read more about the initiative here