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Responding to Terrorism

Responding to Terrorism

On September 13, 2001 a hastily assembled symposium sponsored by the School of Arts & Sciences drew a standing room audience of exhausted and worried students, faculty, and administrators to Irvine Auditorium on Penn’s campus. The panel comprised Penn’s finest faculty researching and teaching on the subject, including the Law School’s Professor Seth Kreimer, and was moderated by University President Dr. Judith Rodin. Dr. Rodin introduced the panel: “We thought under the circumstances that it would be useful to bring some of the collective wisdom of the faculty to bear on the critically important events of the week.” Professor Kreimer was joined by Brendan O’Leary, a Visiting Fellow at Penn who is Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of Government at the London School of Economics and Political Science, who has written extensively on hostilities in Northern Ireland; Arthur Waldron, Lauder Professor of International Relations in Penn’s Department of History, who focused on international military and diplomatic issues; Ian Lustick and Robert Vitalis, Professors in the Department of Political Science who focused on Middle Eastern politics in an international context. In his introduction, Professor Kreimer said, “My hope…is to raise with you the concern, rooted both in my commitment to our constitutional values and in my study of our constitutional history that America’s defense should not come at the cost of the very ideals that make it worth defending. Let me briefly address three sets of concerns arising out of our commitments to equality, to liberty, and to individual dignity.” For the complete text and audio recording of Professor Kreimer’s remarks, and those of his academic colleagues, visit http://www.upenn.edu/almanac/ v48/n04/Terrorism.html

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