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In Books, Newspapers and on Television, Professor Allen is a Multimedia Moralizer 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8

 
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We all have obligations to be morally engaged leaders. We all ought to moralize in public, by which I mean, we all ought to help shape the public policies embodied in public laws. If we don’t, who will? It is pointless to be passionate, but private about your values.

I once feared becoming a highly public moralizer would take my mind away from the classroom and detract from my teaching. If anything, my teaching has improved. After live television, a classroom audience is a piece of cake.

For example, after commenting on television about U.S. immigration reform debates, I conducted further research on the topic and decided to add immigration policy to the curriculum of my Penn undergraduate course, “Law, Justice and Morality.”

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