A Message from the Dean
Pandemic Proofing
A Campus Crossroad
Five All-Stars 40 and Under
Berger Recalls Early Role in Space Program
The Brief
Graduation/Reunion
Faculty News & Publications
Philanthropy
Alumni Briefs
In Memoriam
Case Closed
 
In Books, Newspapers and on Television, Professor Allen is a Multimedia Moralizer 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8

 
FEATURED STORIES
NEW PROFESSORSHIPS
NEW FACULTY
MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS
PRINT
BROADCAST
ONLINE
And it carries perils, of course. Sounding like an idiot, trivializing profound issues and getting in over one’s head are definite dangers. Practicing attorneys on camera must take care not to give legal advice, not to reveal client confidences, and not to take positions that conflict with clients’ interests. As members of the clergy, a priest and a rabbi have automatic moral authority. Where does the moral authority of a professor and a lawyer come from? Many individual lawyers shine with an aura of trustworthiness because of their accomplishments in the public interest. Others stink to high heaven with the stench of suspicion. A lawyer can connote adversarial, sophistical, crooked and partisan as easily as fair, impartial, righteous and just. We lawyers have to earn our moral standing.

Previous Page Next Page