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Five All-Stars 40 and Under
Berger Recalls Early Role in Space Program
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In Memoriam
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In Books, Newspapers and on Television, Professor Allen is a Multimedia Moralizer 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8

 
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I loved doing “The Ethical Edge.” It was a radical change from the routine of teaching and scholarship that has been my life for more than two decades. The hourlong shows often aired on Sunday nights. The show produced engaging discussions on topics such as Hurricane Katrina, everyday ethics, and the ethical impact of technology. We explored interpersonal relations, work relationships, crime, even the ethics of travel.

As a result of the television show and the newspaper column, moralizing in public has become a way of life for me. It is diverting — I consider it fun. Yet, as a lawyer, expressing normative views on sensitive, deeply felt, controversial issues carries with it special responsibilities.

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