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Catherine T. Struve, Assistant Professor of Law, presented “The Paradox of Delegation: Interpreting the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure”at the annual Faculty Retreat in September 2001; and “How Bad Law Made a Hard Case Easy: Nevada v. Hicks and the Subject Matter Jurisdiction of Tribal Courts” at the Penn Journal of Constitutional Law’s Symposium on Native Americans and the Constitution in February 2002. In October 2001, Struve and Assistant Professor Polk Wagner presented their paper, “Realspace Sovereigns in Cyberspace” at the TPRC’s 29th Annual Research Conference on Communication, Information and Internet Policy in Alexandria, Virginia. In March 2002, Struve participated in the Law School’s Edward V. Sparer Symposium, “Suing the Government,” as a commentator.

  • “How Bad Law Made a Hard Case Easy: Nevada v. Hicks and the Subject Matter Jurisdiction of Tribal Courts” University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law (Forthcoming)
  • “The Paradox of Delegation: Interpreting the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure” University of Pennsylania Law Review (Forthcoming 2002)
  • “Realspace Sovereigns in Cyberspace: Problems with the ACPA,” co-authored with R. Polk Wagner, 17 Berkeley Tech. L. J. (Forthcoming 2002).

Clyde Summers, Jefferson B. Fordham Professor of Law Emeritus

  • “Employment at Will in the United States: The Divine Right of Employers,” Scritti in Onore di Gino Giugni (2000)

Michael L. Wachter, William B. Johnson Professor of Law and Economics, and Co-Director of the Institute for Law and Economics (ILE), organized, with co-director Professor Edward B. Rock, a Roundtable on Corporate Law at Penn Law School in Spring 2001. In addition, Wachter co-organized a Labor Law Roundtable with ILE board member Marshall Babson of Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue. In December 2000, under the auspices of the ILE, Wachter and Rock organized a two-day conference on Norms and Corporate Law, a symposium on the relationship between law and non-legally enforceable norms in the governance of business organizations.

  • “Takeover Defense when Financial Markets are (Only) Relatively Efficient,” (Forthcoming 2002)
  • “Dangerous Liaisons: Corporate Law, Trust Law, and Interdoctrinal Legal Transplants,” co-author Edward B. Rock, 96 Northwestern University Law Review 651 (2002)
  • “Islands of Conscious Power: Law, Norms and the Self Governing Corporation,” co-author Edward B. Rock, Symposium: Norms and Corporate Law, 149 University of Pennsylvania Law Review 1619 ( 2001). Also published in 44 Corporate Practice Commentator, 115 (2002)
  • “Meeting by Signals, Playing by Norms: Complementary Accounts of Nonlegal Cooperation in Institutions,” coauthor Edward B. Rock, 36 University of Richmond Law Review 423 (2002)
  • “Introduction,” co-author Edward B. Rock, Symposium: Norms and Corporate Law, 149 University of Pennsylvania Law Review (2001)
  • “Corporate Law as Facilitator of Self Governance,” coauthor Edward B. Rock, 34 Georgia Law Review (2000)
  • “Difficulties in Deregulation When Wage Costs are the Major Cost,” co-authors Barry T. Hirsch and James W. Gillula, in Future Directions in Postal Reform (Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000)
  • “Waiting for the Omelet to Set: Match-Specific Asset and Minority Oppression in the Close Corporation,” coauthor Edward B. Rock, in Concentrated Corporate Ownership, ed. Randall Morck (NBER/University of Chicago Press, 1999); reprinted in 24 Journal of Corporation Law 913 (1999) and Corporate Practice Commentator (2000)
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