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“Modern lawyers are called upon to solve all kinds of problems, not just those that fit neatly into a traditional ‘legal’ category,” Wagner states. “By exposing students to subjects such as technology in a way that they can understand it, we can offer a guide for further learning into the future.”

Wrapping up curricular offerings, Professor Anita Allen-Castellitto teaches “Privacy in Law” and spoke on this subject at the University of Houston Law Review Symposium on “E-Commerce and Privacy” this past June where she presented the paper “Minor Distractions: Protecting Children from E-Commerce.”

Through the Port of Technology students developed relationships with scientists and innovators already established in their fields. Through Wharton, Law students collaborated with student business start-ups.

Practice Professor
Dina Schlossberg

In practical matters, through the Small Business Clinic in the Gittis Center for Clinical Legal Education, Practice Professor Dina Schlossberg introduced a sub-specialty advising technology start-ups.

Although it is not a formal part of the Small Business Clinic, its success bodes well for students this year. In Academic Year 2000-2001, students in this clinic advised six different Internet companies as clients. The clients came through collaborations with the Wharton School and the Port of Technology Center of the University City Science Center. (The Port of Technology was launched after it received a multi-million dollar grant from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to create a corridor of technology companies, an incubator of start-ups, on Market Street in University City.)

Clinic students wrote up privacy statements and terms of use contracts for Internet sites. They drafted articles of incorporation and executive compensation agreements for the nascent companies. Through the Port of Technology students developed relationships with scientists and innovators already established in their fields. Through Wharton, Law students collaborated with student business start-ups.

“Teaching students how to deal with different kinds of clients is part of our purpose educatively,” Schlossberg comments. “These are good experiences for the students to learn from because sometimes the Internet business people won’t stop to think about the legal implications of what they’re doing. That’s the lawyer’s role.”

 
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