A Message from the Dean
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Debt’s Dominion: A History of Bankruptcy Law in America, an excerpt from a new book by Prof. David A. Skeel, Jr.

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The fact that Penn had so many law professors with interests (and degrees) in philosophy made it clear to me that Penn was committed to the study of law and philosophy.

“Penn has a number of faculty appointed in both the Law School and the Philosophy Department who work primarily in moral, political, and legal philosophy, which encompass my main academic interests. It’s common when choosing a philosophy program to choose according to faculty members who one would like to work with, and my decision to come to Penn was based in large part on its faculty. Stephen Perry and Samuel Freeman were the faculty with whom I most wanted to work at Penn. The fact that Penn had so many law professors with interests (and degrees) in philosophy made it clear to me that Penn was committed to the study of law and philosophy.”

After he finishes his degrees, Oberdiek predicts that he will work for a law firm for a few years before pursuing a career as an academic. “In a perfect world, I’d have a primary appointment in a law school and an appointment in a philosophy department, but we’ll see.”

 
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