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The Alumni Office is here to support and celebrate its vibrant Law School community. No matter if you are approaching your first reunion or your fiftieth, we are here to help you.

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Golkin Exterior, from the Courtyard

Golkin Exterior, from the Courtyard

Stay Involved with the Law School

Your place in the Law School community does not end with graduation. Whether you’re moving to a new city, searching for a new job, or hoping to connect with other alumni, there are several ways to stay active as an alumni.

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The Law School we know today is possible because of our alumni community’s support. There are several ways to give back—how will you make a difference?

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Resources for Alumni

Whether you’re a recent graduate or a seasoned professional, we are here to support you at every stage of your career. 

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October 28, 2021

ML Alumni Panel: How Alumni are Utilizing the ML Education

Featuring alumni from a wide range of career fields and levels of professional experience, this panel discussion will focus on how ML alumni are using their legal education after graduation and the value of the ML degree in their current roles. The panel will be facilitated by Dianne Hull, Penn Career Services Advisor to ML Students, and Natalie Green, Director of Operations for the ML Program, with an introduction by Executive Director Catharine Restrepo. Join us to get all of your questions answered by recent alumni of the ML Program! Aren Raisinghani MSE/ML’21, Data Engineer, Crash Safety, Tesla Casey Scott ML’20, Chief of Staffs IT Procurement, Bristol Myers Squibb Raul Martinez, MBA/ML’19, Senior Strategy Consultant, M&A, Accenture Christina Palandro ML’21, Contract Specialist, Accenture  

November 1, 2021

Abortion Access and Economic Justice: Dobbs, SB8, and Beyond

12:00 – 1:15 PM | Gittis 213 Student Group Sponsors: If/When/How, Disabled & Allied Law Students Association (DALSA), and American Constitution Society for Law & Policy (ACS) Abortion care will always be available to those with money. But for those who lack resources—who make up the majority of those seeking abortion services—accessing abortion care is more complicated. Low-income people seeking abortion encounter many obstacles: lack of access to private insurance and funding through federal programs like Medicaid, extensive travel that requires funds and time off work, navigating delays required by some state laws and clinic policies, the cost of the procedure, limited access to self-managed abortion, institutionalization, and other aspects that are exacerbated by intersecting identities, including race, gender, immigration status, and disability. The divide in abortion access for low-income families has only grown in the last two years, both because of COVID-19 and because of a growing trend by state legislatures to implement regressive policies that restrict abortion access. But those efforts have been matched by grassroots organizers who work tirelessly to ensure that care will remain available to people regardless of socioeconomic status. If/When/How, in partnership with DALSA and ACS, presents a panel of legal experts, advocates, and organizers to discuss the issue and how they expect it to change in the next few months—which will be a dynamic time in the field of reproductive rights. Panelists: Thalia González, Associate Professor of Politics Science at Occidental College and Senior Scholar at Georgetown Law (Center on Poverty and Inequality) Marsha Jones, CEO and Co-Founder at The Afiya Center Moderator: Serena Mayeri, Professor of Law and History at Penn Carey Law This program has been approved for 1.0 Ethics CLE credits for Pennsylvania lawyers. CLE credit may be available in other jurisdictions as well. Attendees seeking CLE credit should make a payment via the online registration link in the amount of $20.00 ($10.00 public interest/non-profit attorneys). In order to receive the appropriate amount of credit, passwords provided throughout the program must be noted in your evaluation form. Penn Law Alumni receive CLE credits free through The W.P. Carey Foundation’s generous commitment to Lifelong Learning. Registration Required. Details to come soon!

November 1, 2021

Alumni Spotlight: Dr. Roland Witzel, Senior Legal Officer at Germany’s Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media (BKM)

Join us for this 30-minute lunchtime chat with Dr. Roland Witzel, an alum of both our LLM and JD program. Hear from Dr. Witzel on his transition from private law to government service. Learn about the varied nature of his portfolio at the federal culture administration. Discuss his role in restoring Germany’s cultural landscape during and post-COVID through BKM’s “NEUSTART KULTUR” (Restart Culture) initiative.

November 2, 2021

Solving the Democracy Problem

12:00 – 1:15 PM | Gittis 213 Student Group Sponsors: Democracy Law Project (DLP) and the Law Students for a Democratic Society (LSDS) Scholar and activist Noam Chomsky has argued that economic inequality comes from the existence of super wealth, which is inherently unjust and undermines democracy. This argument traces back to Aristotle’s Politics: the problem with democracy is that the poor will try to take the property of the rich. Chomsky calls this the “democracy problem,” and identifies two solutions: reduce inequality or reduce democracy. In the United States over the past sixty years, the clear trend has been towards reducing democracy. Since the Freedom Movement’s deep engagement with, and demands for, both greater democracy and greater economic equality, there’s been a significant shift from common ownership structures to shareholder ownership, pension plans to 401(K)’s, and a decline in government social programs, all leading to increased economic inequality. Simultaneously, continued voter suppression, gerrymandering, the electoral college, an unrepresentative Senate, and the weakening of campaign finance law have all reflected a push to reduce democracy. These twin pressures burst to the forefront during the 2020 election, which demonstrated that the true cost of economic injustice in American society reaches beyond economic pressures—it frays our political systems and leads us away from inclusive, just democracy. The Democracy Law Project and Law Students for a Democratic Society will be joined by several panelists to discuss this interplay, and how we can continue pushing for greater democracy. Panelists: Andy Lamas L’81, Professor at the University of Pennsylvania Ian Vandewalker, Senior Counsel in the Brennan Center’s Democracy Program This program has been approved for 1.0 Ethics CLE credits for Pennsylvania lawyers. CLE credit may be available in other jurisdictions as well. Attendees seeking CLE credit should make a payment via the online registration link in the amount of $20.00 ($10.00 public interest/non-profit attorneys). In order to receive the appropriate amount of credit, passwords provided throughout the program must be noted in your evaluation form. Penn Law Alumni receive CLE credits free through The W.P. Carey Foundation’s generous commitment to Lifelong Learning. Registration Required. Details to come soon!

Recent Event Highlights

Reunion Weekend

Missing life at the Law School? We miss you too. Come back for this year’s reunion weekend to reconnect with former classmates, faculty, and other alumni.

More information coming soon for 2022!

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Golkin

New Alumni Clubs

Six new affinity groups are now open to alumni throughout the world

Sansom St. entrance to Golkin Hall.

Board of Advisors Challenge

Thank you to our friends and alumni who made our Challenge in December 2020 a success!

Student support during COVID-19 pandemic

Find out more about how you can support our students during the outbreak.

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion at Penn Law

In July, Dean Theodore Ruger issued a statement to students, faculty and staff announcing some of the immediate actions Penn Law took to work internally and externally against racism and to promote meaningful change toward a more just reality. Since then, the Law School and its Office of Inclusion & Engagement (I&E) have continued the work to create a more inclusive community in the key areas of student support, capacity building, and racial justice programming.