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Legal History Faculty

  • imageWilliam Wilson Bratton, Deputy Dean and Nicholas F. Gallicchio Professor of Law; Co-Director, Institute for Law and Economics

    William Bratton is recognized internationally as a leading writer on business law. He brings an interdisciplinary perspective to a wide range of subject matters that encompass corporate governance, corporate legal history, corporate finance, accounting, and comparative corporate law.


  • imageWilliam Ewald
    Professor of Law and Philosophy

    William Ewald is an internationally recognized scholar in legal philosophy and comparative law. His interest in examining the distinctive character of American law from a comparative perspective led him to write on the legal philosophy of James Wilson, the first professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania in 1790.


  • imageSarah Barringer Gordon
    Arlin M. Adams Professor of Constitutional Law and Professor of History

    Sally Gordon is a widely recognized scholar and commentator on religion in American public life and the law of church and state. Her books include The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America and her new book will address religion and property in American history.


  • imageSophia Z. Lee
    , Assistant Professor of Law

    Sophia Lee is a legal historian whose scholarship synthesizes labor, constitutional, and administrative law. She has written about administrative agencies’ role in shaping constitutional law; civil rights and labor advocates’ challenges to workplace discrimination during the early Cold War; and conservative legal movements in the post-New Deal era.


imageSerena Mayeri
, Professor of Law and History

Serena Mayeri’s scholarship focuses on the historical impact of progressive and conservative social movements on legal and constitutional change. She is the author of Reasoning from Race: Feminism, Law, and the Civil Rights Revolution.

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