Courses

The University of Pennsylvania provides graduate and professional students with numerous course offerings related to regulation. The following list of recent courses offered at Penn illustrates the breadth of offerings. This list is not complete, nor is every course listed offered every year. Please check with each school's registrar for the most current information.

Law

LAW 601: Administrative Law
LAW 634: Environmental Law
LAW 736: International Trade Regulation
LAW 931: Regulatory Policy Analysis
LAW 939: Health Law and Policy
LAW 952: US and EU Telecommunications Law
LAW 985: Law and Policy of Environmental Cost-Benefit Analysis

Wharton

BPUB 203: Business in the Global Political Environment
BPUB 204: Cost Benefit Analysis
BPUB 761: Risk Analysis and Environmental Management
BPUB 987: Regulatory Policy

Other:

BIOE 550: Bioethics and Society
ENVS 406: Community-Based Environmental Health
ENVS 601: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies
ENVS 617: Innovative Environmental Management Strategies
HCMG 215: The Pharmaceutical, Biotech, and Medical Device Industries
PSYC 600: Judgments and Decisions
PSYC 473: Neuroeconomics
STAT 712: Decision-Making Under Uncertainty



LAW 601: Administrative Law

We live in an administrative state, populated by thousands of governmental bodies that collectively exercise pervasive authority over the entire economy and the lives of every American. Unlike courts, which enjoy explicit constitutional independence, administrative agencies constitute a constitutionally ambiguous "fourth branch of government." Also unlike courts, most agencies have authority to wield a wide variety of regulatory powers other than adjudication, including rulemaking, licensing, advice-giving, and prosecution. "Administrative law" is the body of constitutional, statutory, Executive, and "common law" principles that constrain and thereby seek to legitimate the exercise of these powers. This course will be a critical examination of these principles. Topics include: the place of agencies in our tripartite structure of government, the choice between rulemaking and adjudication as devices for making policy, procedural requirements for the exercise of various administrative powers, and judicial review of administrative decisions.
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LAW 634: Environmental Law

This course focuses on both the substance and process of environmental law in the United States. The goal is for students to become familiar with the basic structure of federal environmental law and regulation, both to prepare for legal counseling and advocacy as well as to be able to engage in policy evaluation and design of environmental law. The course will cover key federal environmental statutes, such as the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Superfund, and the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act, as well as selected EPA regulations. The course will focus on the major legal and policy issues underlying environmental statutes, as well as on legal methods of statutory interpretation. Classroom attendance and preparation is expected. There will be an in-class exam.
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LAW 736: International Trade Regulation

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the legal framework for U.S. and international regulation of international trade in goods. The course will include: a brief introduction to the economics of trade; an examination of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), and related instruments; and an analysis of U.S. laws providing relief from unfairly traded imports, including the antidumping and countervailing duty laws, and of U.S. laws providing for other restrictions on imports, such as safeguards.
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LAW 931: Regulatory Policy Analysis

Lawyers play a key role in making public policy, whether in legislative, executive, or judicial settings. This seminar focuses on the role of the lawyer as policy analyst, aiming to develop skills of research, analysis, and exposition suitable for effective policy counseling and decision making. The seminar will emphasize a general framework for analyzing any kind of social or economic problem and assessing different types of alternative legal solutions. Seminar participants will work either individually or in teams (at their choosing) to prepare and present their own original policy analysis of an important problem they select. There will be no final exam. Grades will be based on class participation, short papers written during the term, and a final policy analysis presentation/project which may be completed individually or in groups.
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LAW 939: Health Law and Policy

This seminar will examine recent debates in health law and policy through discussion of current events, proposed legislation, and scholarly articles in the legal, medical, and public policy literatures. Weekly topics may vary depending on student interest, but will likely include malpractice liability reform, obesity, health disparities, direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising, and other issues related to health care access, quality, and financing. Requirements include a presentation/discussion of one health law-related current event, a research paper of at least 20 pages on any approved health law-related topic, and an oral presentation of the research paper. Evaluation will be based on the paper and class participation.
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LAW 952: US and EU Telecommunications Law

The US and Europe have historically taken widely divergent approaches to the regulation of communications technologies. In more recent years, the approaches have begun to converge, in part because of the increasing globalization of the telecommunications market and in part because of certain intellectual insights that have transformed the conventional wisdom about economic regulation. This seminar will compare the regulatory approaches taken in the US and Europe, studying both the ways in which they have converged and the key differences in intellectual commitments that tend to keep them distinct. In the process, the seminar will provide an introduction to EU law, covering both the EU's institutions and lawmaking process. The seminar should be of particular interest to students interested in Internet policy, economic regulation, EU law, and the impact of different institutional structures (such as government ownership and federalism) on regulatory policy. The seminar will meet for twelve weeks in the fall semester. It will meet again for two sessions late in the spring semester, when students will present their papers.
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LAW 985: Law and Policy of Environmental Cost-Benefit Analysis

Federal and state governments, and the U.S. public, are increasingly turning to cost-benefit analysis and risk assessment to guide rulemaking decisions and to set priorities among interventions intended to protect health, safety, environmental quality, homeland security, financial assets, etc. This course prepares students to critically evaluate risk and cost-benefit analyses, in order to help make decisions that are responsive to law, science, economics, and public values. Students will analyze recent and pending decisions by EPA, FDA, OSHA, and other agencies, to explore how analysis has informed or obscured important controversies, and how the courts have shaped both analysis and outcome. We will also discuss the art of crafting cost-effective controls, considering both traditional rulemaking and innovative proposals for new policy instruments.  Required readings will include a mix of journal articles about methods of analysis and regulatory policy, along with close analysis of several major court decisions.  The course instructor is an environmental health scientist, but the course will not require any particular science or math background.  Rather, lectures and class discussion will emphasize insights the instructor gleaned during 10 years as the chief rulemaking official at OSHA and member of numerous EPA advisory committees, including many details of regulatory analyses, court decisions, and enforcement actions that are poorly captured in the public record.
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BPUB 203: Bioethics and Society

This course focuses on business issues that are mediated through the public sector. Specific governmental policies towards markets will be examined, including antitrust policy, economic regulation and deregulation, social regulation, and market infrastucture (intellectual property, fraud and securities regulation.) The course includes discussion of corporate responsibility and ethical issues in international business. Lectures and case studies focus on currently pending actions worldwide, including Internet related issues. The course applies theoretical principles of strategic thinking, industrial organization, and political science to studying the interactions between multinational firms and political institutions.
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BPUB 204: Cost Benefit Analysis

Cost benefit analysis -- the principal tool for project and policy evaluation in the public sector. For government whose "products" are rarely sold, the valuation of costs and benefits by means alternative to market prices is necessary. It is the counterpart to cost accounting in private firms and provides guidance for avoiding wasteful projects and undertaking those that are worthwhile. Given government regulations, cost benefit evaluations are critical for many private sector activities. Real estate developers, manufacturing firms, employers of all types are required to provide evaluations of environmental impacts and of urban impacts for their proposed projects. They too must engage in cost benefit analysis, in the valuation social benefits and costs. Government analysts, consultants, and private firms regularly carry out cost benefit analyses for major investments -- bridges, roads, transit systems, convention centers, sports stadia, dams -- as well as for regulatory activities -- -- OSHA workplace safety regulations and the Clean Air Act are two important examples.
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BPUB 761: Risk Analysis and Environmental Management

This course is designed to introduce students to the role of risk assessment, risk perception and risk management in dealing with uncertain health, safety and environmental risks including the threat of terrorism. It explores the role of decision analysis as well as the use of scenarios for dealing with these problems. The course will evaluate the role of policy tools such as risk communication, economic incentives, insurance, regulation and private-public partnerships in developing strategies for managing these risks. A project will enable students to apply the concepts discussed in the course to a concrete problem.
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BPUB 987: Regulatory Policy

This course will examine the economics of microeconomic government interventions in the marketplace and closely-related topics in industrial organization. Some of the economic topics that will be discussed include contracting, standards, and networks with application to regulation, deregulation, and privatization, strategic alliances with application to antitrust policy, and research and development with application to intellectual property policy. Most of the reading will consist of scholarly papers.
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BIOE 550: Bioethics and Society

This set of courses will deal with bioethical issues in popular culture addressed from a social science perspective. Courses to be offered include: "Sociology of Bioethics," and "Media and the Doctor-Patient Relationship."
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ENVS 406: Community-Based Environmental Health

From the fall of the Roman Empire to Love Canal to the epidemics of asthma, childhood obesity and lead poisoning in West Philadelphia, the impact of the environment on health has been a continuous challenge to society. The environment can affect people's health more strongly than biological factors, medical care and lifestyle. The water we drink, the food we eat, the air we breathe, and the neighborhood we live in are all components of the environment that impact our health. Some estimates, based on morbidity and mortality statistics, indicate that the impact of the environment on health is as high as 80%. These impacts are particularly significant in urban areas like West Philadelphia. Over the last 20 years, the field of environmental health has matured and expanded to become one of the most comprehensive and humanly relevant disciplines in science. This course will examine not only the toxicity of physical agents, but also the effects on human health of lifestyle, social and economic factors, and the built environment. Topics include cancer clusters, water borne diseases, radon and lung cancer, lead poisoning, environmental tobacco smoke, respiratory diseases and obesity. Students will research the health impacts of classic industrial pollution case studies in the US. Class discussions will also include risk communication, community outreach and education, access to health care and impact on vulnerable populations. Each student will have the opportunity to focus on Public Health, Environmental Protection, Public Policy, and Environmental Education issues as they discuss approaches to mitigating environmental health risks. This honors seminar will consist of lectures, guest speakers, readings, student presentations, discussions, research, and community service. The students will have two small research assignments including an Environmental and Health Policy Analysis and an Industrial Pollution Case Study Analysis. Both assignments will include class presentations. The major research assignment for the course will be a problem-oriented research paper and presentation on a topic related to community-based environmental health selected by the student. In this paper, the student must also devise practical recommendations for the problem based on their research.
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ENVS 601: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies

A detailed, comprehensive investigation of selected environmental problems. This is the first course taken by students entering the Master of Environmental Studies Program.
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ENVS 617: Innovative Environmental Management Strategies

This course will evaluate innovative environmental management strategies used by corporations, governments, the public, and NGOs including approaches such as the concept of pollution prevention, environmental management systems, green buildings, green product design, product labeling, environmental education, the power of information, market-based techniques, and industrial ecology. Some professionals believe that these innovative approaches have the potential to result in more environmental improvement than will be realized by additional regulatory requirements. This course will address which approaches work best and identify critical elements needed to ensure the best approaches to specific problems. Students will be exposed to real-life situations through expert guest lecturers, case studies, and "hands on" projects.
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HCMG 215: The Pharmaceutical, Biotech, and Medical Device Industries

This course provides an overview of the management, economic and policy issues facing the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industries. The course perspective is global with emphasis on the U.S. as the largest and most profitable market. Critical issues we will examine include: R&D intensive cost structure and rapid technological change; biotechnology and genomics startups and alliances with the pharma industry; a complex global marketplace in which prices are regulated in most countries and customers include governments and insurers, as well as physicians, pharmacists and consumers now reachable through DTC; intense and evolving M&A, including mergers, joint ventures, and complex alliances; government regulation of every business function: R&D, pricing, manufacturing, and promotion; and global products and multinational firms. We use industry and Wharton experts from various disciplines to address these issues.
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PSYC 600  Judgments and Decisions

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PSYC 473  Neuroeconomics

This course will review recent research that combines psychological, economic and neuroscientific approaches to study human and animal decision-making. A particular focus will be on how evidence about the neural processes associated with choices might be used to constrain economic and psychological theories of decision-making. Topics covered will include decisions involving risk and uncertainty, reinforcement learning, strategic interactions and games, and social preferences.
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STAT 712- Decision-Making Under Uncertainty 

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